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Damar Hamlin’s breathing tube removed, told teammates ‘Love you boys’ over FaceTime, Bills say

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The Cincinnati Reds show their support for Damar Hamlin outside of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame on January 4, 2023, in Cincinnati, OH.

Ian Johnson | Icon Sportswire | Getty Images

NFL safety Damar Hamlin’s breathing tube was removed and he FaceTimed into a meeting telling his teammates, “Love you boys,” as he continued his recovery after suffering a terrifying cardiac arrest during Monday night’s game against the Cincinnati Bengals, according to the Buffalo Bills.

The team tweeted Friday about Hamlin’s medical progress.

“Per the physicians at UCMC, Damar’s breathing tube was removed overnight. He continues to progress remarkably in his recovery. His neurologic function remains intact and he has been able to talk to his family and care team,” one tweet read.

Another statement from the team mentioned his interaction with his teammates.

“Damar Hamlin FaceTimed into our team meeting today to talk to players and coaches. What he said to the team: ‘Love you boys.'” The Bills’ tweet was punctuated by a heart emoji.

NFL safety Damar Hamlin’s breathing tube was removed and he FaceTimed into a meeting telling his teammates, “Love you boys,” as he continued his recovery after suffering a terrifying cardiac arrest during Monday night’s game against the Cincinnati Bengals, according to the Buffalo Bills.

The team tweeted Friday about Hamlin’s medical progress.

“Per the physicians at UCMC, Damar’s breathing tube was removed overnight. He continues to progress remarkably in his recovery. His neurologic function remains intact and he has been able to talk to his family and care team,” one tweet read.

Another statement from the team mentioned his interaction with his teammates.

“Damar Hamlin FaceTimed into our team meeting today to talk to players and coaches. What he said to the team: ‘Love you boys.'” The Bills’ tweet was punctuated by a heart emoji.

“Commotio cordis is an incredibly rare event,” Dr. William Knight, professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, said Thursday. “It’s a diagnosis of exclusion,” meaning other conditions have to be ruled out before it can be determined definitively.

“It is on the list of considerations,” Knight said.

Normally, the heart pumps oxygen-rich blood throughout the body about every second. There is a rhythm to the process, keeping the blood flowing at a healthy pace. Every time the heart beats, there is a tiny moment — less than a fifth of a second — that makes it vulnerable to the force of a projectile that can lead to a chaotic and potentially deadly heart rhythm.

It is in this exact moment, experts say, that a blow to the chest in the exact right place can launch an otherwise healthy person into cardiac arrest. The heart’s electrical system malfunctions, and the heartbeat rhythm goes haywire.





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